Garden Fruit

Before we left Thailand for our annual vacation to the UK, I took a look around the garden to check out the plants, trees and flowers. I noticed that growing on the lime tree it had started to bear the fruit of limes. Little buds, but still growing. I was hoping that they would be ready for picking on our return. Yes, we returned to find the fruit growing and ripe. Wow, not only limes, but our banana tree is also producing lovely fruit.

Limes

Limes

Banana

Banana

Keep Shooting.

Insects in the Garden

Everyday I try to experiment with my camera, learning, working through the settings to get a better picture. Today I went out into the garden to find subjects to photograph. Insects, why not, give it a go I thought. Well the pictures below are of my adventures in the garden.

Thai Flying Insect

Thai Flying Insect

Thai Wasp

Thai Wasp

If these sting you are you are in a lot of pain. A friend was in the garden clearing out a few plants and started to run very fast. They had been stung by one of these beauties.

Prying Mantis

Prying Mantis

This little creature stayed in the same position for hours on the water hose. Great little model. Thanks.

Black Wasp

Black Wasp

So if you are at a loss for something to shoot, go into the garden you wont be disappointing. In fact I think I take a few more tomorrow.

Keep Shooting.

At The Races

While my wife was shopping in a nearby city, I decided to take myself of to the horse race track to photograph the races.

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Rhubarb

One for the cooking bloggers. Any chance of a few recipes of the famous rhubarb?

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum) is a species of plant in the family Polygonaceae. They are herbaceous perennials growing from short, thick rhizomes. They have large leaves that are somewhat triangular, with long fleshy petioles. They have small flowers grouped in large compound leafy greenish-white to rose-red inflorescences.

In culinary use, fresh raw petioles (leaf stalks) are crisp (similar to celery) with a strong, tart taste. Most commonly, the plant’s leaf stalks are cooked with sugar and used in pies and other desserts. A number of varieties have been domesticated for human consumption, most of which are recognised as Rheum x hybridum by the Royal Horticultural Society.

Rhubarb is usually considered a vegetable. In the United States, however, a New York court decided in 1947 that since it was used in the United States as a fruit, it counted as a fruit for the purposes of regulations and duties. A side effect was a reduction on imported rhubarb tariffs, as tariffs were higher for vegetables than fruits.

Rhubarb contains anthraquinones including rhein, and emodin and their glycosides (e.g. glucorhein), which impart cathartic and laxative properties. It is hence useful as a cathartic in case of constipation.
In traditional Chinese medicine, rhubarb roots have been used as a laxative for several millennia. Rhubarb also appears in medieval Arabic and European prescriptions.

Well in case you suffer with constipation, there you have it. That’s the stuff for you.

Me, I love it, but, well haven’t had any for a number of moons, since living in Thailand.

Keep Shooting.